Lawsuit Challenges State Law on Sick Time, Employee Benefits

A coalition, including members of the state legislature and city councils, has filed a lawsuit, challenging the constitutionality of a new law set to take effect later this summer. House Bill 2579 precludes cities from regulating “nonwage compensation,” which it defines as items including sick and vacation pay.

The bill was a response to a 2013 measure, which tried to block cities from setting their own “living wage.” Attorney General Mark Brnovich agreed not to enforce that law, since it conflicted with the voter-approved minimum wage measure.

Tempe Councilwoman Lauren Kuby is one of the plaintiffs in this new suit. She said Proposition 202, approved by voters in 2006, allows cities to regulate wages and benefits. "To me, worker protection is fundamental to the general welfare and the public health of our city," Kuby said.

A coalition, including members of the state legislature and city councils, has filed a lawsuit, challenging the constitutionality of a new law set to take effect later this summer. House Bill 2579 precludes cities from regulating “nonwage compensation,” which it defines as items including sick and vacation pay.

The bill was a response to a 2013 measure, which tried to block cities from setting their own “living wage.” Attorney General Mark Brnovich agreed not to enforce that law, since it conflicted with the voter-approved minimum wage measure.

Tempe Councilwoman Lauren Kuby is one of the plaintiffs in this new suit. She said Proposition 202, approved by voters in 2006, allows cities to regulate wages and benefits. "To me, worker protection is fundamental to the general welfare and the public health of our city," Kuby said.

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